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Help in a crisis

 

If there is an immediate danger to life, please dial 999 or go to your nearest Accident and Emergency Department.

I am in Gloucestershire

If you or someone you know needs help in a mental health crisis, call our crisis teams.

Call 0800 169 0398.

And choose one of the following options depending on your location:

  • Option 1 for Stroud and Cotswolds
  • Option 2 for Gloucester and Forest
  • Option 3 for Cheltenham, Tewkesbury and North Cotswolds

Please note: telephone calls may be recorded. If you do not want that to happen, please tell the person who answers your call and they will phone you back on a ‘non-recordable’ telephone.

The number is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Occasionally, callers may be asked to leave their name and number on an answerphone. In these circumstances, staff will return the call within one hour.

I am in Herefordshire

If you are in Herefordshire and need support, please call us using one of the following numbers:

  • Monday to Friday, 9am – 5pm, please contact the team or service who currently provide your care.
  • Monday to Friday, 5pm – 9am and 24 hours on weekends and bank holidays, please call our Mental Health Matters Helpline on: 0800 015 7271

These contact numbers are for people already in contact with our services. If you are not currently in contact with us, please call 111 or your GP.

Our out of hours, weekend and bank holiday service is provided by Mental Health Matters.

If you need help but are not in crisis, please contact your GP if in opening hours, or 111. If you don’t have a GP use the NHS service search to locate the nearest one to you. If your query is not urgent, you can find our contact details here.

Are you feeling vulnerable? Do you need to talk to somebody now?

samaritans

Call free on 116 123
If you are experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those which could lead to suicide, you can call the Samaritans.

Stay Alive App

A pocket suicide prevention resource for the UK, packed full of useful information and tools to help you stay safe in crisis. You can use it if you are having thoughts of suicide or if you are concerned about someone else who may be considering suicide. The app can be accessed through the Apple Store, Google Play and downloaded as a pdf.

childline

Call free on 0800 11 11
If you are a child or a young person you may want to speak to Childline.

selfharm

Call 0808 816 0606
Or text 07537 410 022
A safe, supportive, non-judgmental and informative service for people who self harm, their friends, families and carers.
Open every day 5pm – 10pm for phone and text support.

selfharm

Text 85258
Shout is the UK’s first 24/7 text service, free on all major mobile networks, for anyone in crisis anytime, anywhere. It’s a place to go if you’re struggling to cope and you need immediate help.

  • We can all play a role in stopping the spread of this unpleasant infectious bug
  • Alcohol hand gels DON’T kill the virus – handwashing is the best way to protect yourself against norovirus
  • Laboratory reports of norovirus in the South West for week 44 were higher than the number reported in the equivalent week last year.

Public Health England and NHS England and Improvement are urging people in the South West to follow simple steps stop the spread of this nasty bug this winter.

Norovirus can live on hard surfaces for hours and spreads very quickly through environments where lots of people are mingling closely, such as schools, nurseries, care homes and hospitals. The best way to protect yourself and others from catching this unpleasant sickness bug is simply to wash your hands thoroughly with warm water and soap, and to keep the environment you live and work in clean.

Alcohol or antibacterial hand sanitisers are a popular choice for people wanting to protect themselves from the bugs that circulate during winter, causing illnesses such as norovirus. However, what most people don’t know is that hand sanitisers are NOT an effective protection against this common sickness bug.

Norovirus is a highly contagious stomach bug that causes diarrhoea and vomiting. Most people will recover within a few days and can return to work or school. However, if Norovirus is introduced unintentionally into places where lots of people congregate, such as schools, nurseries, hospitals and care homes, the illness can spread incredibly quickly and affect vulnerable people.
In some situations, Norovirus outbreaks can lead to hospital ward or school and nursery closures. This can have a knock-on effect of disrupting peoples’ jobs, routines or putting the health of people with underlying conditions at risk.

It’s so simple to play your part in stopping the spread of Norovirus this winter – just Think NORO:

N No visits to hospitals, care homes and GP surgeries if you are suffering from symptoms of Norovirus – send someone else to visit loved ones until you are better
O Once you’ve been symptom-free for at least 48 hours, you’re safe to return to work, school or visit hospitals and care home
R Regularly wash your hands with soap and warm water, especially after using the toilet, and before eating or preparing food
O Only hand-washing will prevent spread of Norovirus – alcohol hand gels DON’T kill the virus

Dominic Mellon, Consultant in Health Protection for Public Health England South West, said: “Levels of norovirus are increasing in line with expected levels so far this winter but many schools, nurseries, hospitals and care homes across the South West have reported outbreaks in recent weeks.

“We work closely with these institutions throughout the year to ensure that they have the right information and guidance to help prevent the spread of infection. But it’s important for everyone to remember that we all have a role to play in reducing the spread of winter bugs. Norovirus is unusual in that hand sanitisers don’t kill the virus and so hand washing is the best way to stop this nasty infection before it passes on to others.
“The symptoms of norovirus include suddenly feeling sick, projectile vomiting, and watery diarrhoea. Some people also have a slight fever, headaches, painful stomach cramps and aching limbs. The symptoms appear one to two days after you become infected and typically last for up to 2 or 3 days.

“Anyone who has been infected should stay off work or school for 48 hours after their symptoms have ceased.”

Michael Marsh, Medical Director & Chief Clinical Information Officer for NHS England and NHS Improvement – South West, said: “We’ve already seen a number of clinical settings affected by norovirus ahead of winter, and unfortunately instances like these are likely to rise over the coming months as the temperature drops.

“If you are feeling unwell, have diarrhoea or vomiting; please don’t visit a hospital for at least 48 hours after the last symptom has gone. Norovirus can have a serious impact on patients who are often more vulnerable to catching it.

“Self-treating at home is the best way to help yourself and avoid putting others at risk. You don’t normally need to see your GP as usually fluids and paracetamol to relieve pain, as required, are sufficient prior to its resolution – antibiotics won’t help because it’s caused by a virus.

“If you’re concerned, the NHS 111 service is a helpful alternative to presenting to your GP in person for advice.”

Hospitals across the South West remain very busy due to winter pressures but there a range of simple steps which people can take to stay well and avoid having to go to A&E. These include:

  • as soon as you feel unwell with a cough or cold get advice from a pharmacist, before it gets too serious
  • alternatively if you are ill, call the non-emergency NHS 111 helpline which can advise you on the best service for your needs
  • keep as warm as you can and if possible maintain rooms at 18°c.
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